Tips for Handling Your Sensitive Skin

Tips for Handling Your Sensitive Skin
Tips for Handling Your Sensitive Skin

Many people think that they have sensitive skin, but the truth is that all skin is sensitive in varying degrees. Skin on the face, throat, and hands can be particularly sensitive because skin in these areas is relatively thin and regularly exposed to UV rays (even with stringent sunscreen application, exposure to the sun is still more damaging than having the skin regularly covered). The good news is that handling sensitive skin well can prevent damage, wrinkles, breakouts, rashes, and sensitivity from products or exposure to the elements.

A dermatologist defines “sensitive skin” as skin that reacts via bumps, erosion or pustules, or as extremely dry skin that doesn’t offer proper nerve protection, and may become easily flushed. While this holds true, sensitive skin remains a catch-all phrase for skin that reacts adversely to common external stressors (like cold weather or certain products) and internal stressors (like stress or certain foods).

Are You Sensitive?

If your skin has a tendency to show uncomfortable reactions to common stimulants, it is best to avoid over-cleansing or stripping the skin. Be wary of using wash cloths, loofahs, or scrub brushes on very sensitive skin. Your own hands and a gentle, non-foaming cleanser are usually more than enough to give skin a proper cleansing. If you have sensitive skin, but still seek the anti-aging benefits of regular exfoliation, choose a gentle resurfacing product like The Method: Polish Sensitive Skin, which uses finely milled crystals and gentle fruit enzymes to reveal fresh, bright skin without harsh side effects on sensitive skin.

Tips for Handling Your Sensitive Skin
Tips for Handling Your Sensitive Skin

Only pure minerals are used as the exfoliating grains in this product, which is exactly what sensitive skin needs to shine. The Method: Polish Sensitive Skin also has a warming feature, which aids in the gentle removal of unnecessary surface cells without stripping away healthy skin. As faster cell turnover occurs as a result of regular exfoliation, new, younger-looking skin will begin to emerge. If you have a diagnosed reason for sensitive skin, such as eczema, dermatitis or rosacea, The Method: Polish Sensitive Skin can be a great choice for gentle exfoliation.

Sensitive Skin Can Be Beautiful

In some cases, allergies may cause sensitive skin. Your dermatologist can test for allergies with a simple patch test. In these cases, avoiding certain foods or products may help manage your sensitive skin. Otherwise, there are so many potential causes for sensitive skin that it’s nearly impossible to diagnose. Management is key, and properly cleansing, nourishing and moisturizing your skin shouldn’t be overlooked.

Sensitive skin can be either very dry or excessively oily. Extremely dry complexions may result in painful, red, or flaky skin. Using a product like The Method: Cleanse Sensitive Skin as a foundational part of your skincare regimen is essential. Fragrance-free and gentle on your skin, it removes surface dirt and debris with soothing licorice and oat phytocompounds to combat the appearance of redness and soothe irritation. Sometimes simply switching to a gentler, natural daily cleanser can make a big difference in how sensitive your skin is.

When dealing with sensitive skin, a good-quality moisturizer is crucial to skin’s health. Choose a product like The Method: Nourish Sensitive Skin, which is fragrance-free, calming, and rich in hexapeptides and polyphenols to deliver anti-aging results without irritating skin. A moisturizer with antioxidants and phytosterols, like The Method: Nourish Sensitive Skin, helps to protect skin and fight against environmental aggressors and the elements.

Taking care of sensitive skin is simple with The Lancer Method®: Sensitive Skin. Protecting skin from the sun, and monitoring your stress levels creates a strong foundation for your sensitive skincare regimen. Once you ease into it, you’ll discover the healthy, radiant skin that will leave you smiling for years to come.

Just for Makeup Junkies

Tips for Handling Your Sensitive Skin
Tips for Handling Your Sensitive Skin

Ideally, people with sensitive skin should avoid cosmetics entirely, but that is not always feasible. If you do wear makeup, use a foundation formula without added fragrance. If you’re comfortable wearing only powder, that is even better. Steer clear of waterproof cosmetics since they require a special, irritating cleanser to remove them.

For all skin types, but especially sensitive complexions, it’s important to avoid sharing cosmetics, clean your brushes regularly, and throw out cosmetics as they age. Makeup does have a shelf life, and for good reason. Lipsticks and mascara over six months old should get the boot.

If you are curious about a new product, conduct a patch-test before applying to your face to see if your skin reacts negatively to the product. Behind the ear is a safe place, as it is similar to the skin on your face and is not near a critical area (like eyes or nose), and it can be hidden if you do have a reaction. Remember to also introduce products slowly into your skincare regimen—we recommend allowing 2-3 days in-between using a new product to make sure skin adjusts accordingly.

 

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